Indigenous brands, Maori business, Kaupapa Growth and innovation, collaborative pilot projects, culture connection and exchange, design enabled economic, culturally enriched.

 
 
 
 
 
 

He Kāinga Hou ki te Hau Kāinga Housing development on multiply-owned ancestral land in a high-growth

Masters thesis submitted as partial fulfilment of requirements for the degree of MSc in Urban Management and Development, Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies (2010)

Location:
Western Bay of Plenty

Iwi:
Research included work with papakainga project managers Victoria Kingi (Mangatawa Papamoa Blocks Incorporated) and Dean Flavell (Makahae Marae)

Nga Aho practitioner:
Biddy Livesey

Resources:
Livesey2010HousingMultiplyOwnedAncestralLand

He Kāinga Hou ki te Hau Kāinga Housing development on multiply-owned ancestral land in a high-growth

This Masters thesis explores how owners of Maori land develop housing on their land, how property development concepts apply to these developments, and the effect of government policies on the viability of housing development on Maori land. The research documents two case studies in the western Bay of Plenty, New Zealand, where owners of Maori land have taken up the challenge to develop housing on their land for their people. The thesis concludes that in order to encourage more housing on Maori land, there is a critical need to balance the protective mechanisms of the Maori Land Act with targeted government policies that increase the viability of housing development on Maori land, where this fits with owners’ aspirations.
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