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Te Rongo Aniwaniwa /A Dissonant Harmony

Curated by Ariane Craig-Smith & Chris McBride for The Kauri Project Inhabiting the space where concepts of art, science and cultural knowledge intersect, The Kauri Project is a curatorial endeavour dedicated to examining the relationship between people and landscape, focusing on our unique and threatened indigenous kauri forest ecology. Working in collaboration with artists, scientists, iwi and community we seek to expand awareness of the crucial place of kauri in our biological and cultural landscape, and the threat posed to this unique species by kauri dieback disease. Since the micro-organism Phytopthora agathidicida was formally identified as the cause of kauri dieback in 2008, scientists have worked to understand the disease and establish how best to protect kauri from this deadly threat. A healthy kauri forest is a wealth of diverse life, a delicate ecological network of interdependence, within which the kauri tree is a keystone species. Able to grow to ancient age and massive scale, kauri have the ability to modify the land on which they live. Around and on the kauri a host of other species live and thrive, some of them only found in this association. Late to this relationship, people have also flourished in Aotearoa/New Zealand, briefly prospering from our relationship with kauri, though at a cost to our landscape which we seek now to redress. Once a powerful presence across Northern Aotearoa, from Waikato to Cape Reinga, kauri forest now exists in scattered fragments and as a legend in the imaginations of the people. Throughout all of this region a handful of ancient giants still stand and young kauri strive for survival, while the ghost of their kin haunt the landscape. Te Rongo Aniwaniwa / A Dissonant Harmony brings together work by artists from across the Waikato and beyond to explore the complexity of our relationship with this tree and its forest. The works included are a lament for kauri lost in the past to milling and clearing, and now to dieback – but also speak to a hope for a renewed relationship between people and kauri, of care, love and regrowth. Kauri ki uta, Kauri ki tai – May Kauri once again flourish from hilltop to the sea.

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Location:
Kirikiriroa/Hamiton

Iwi:
Artists affiliated with: Ngāti Koroki Kahukura; Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Pikiao; Ngāti Awa, Te Whana ā Apanui; Ngāti Wai, Ngāti Ruanui; Ngāti Pakahi ki

Nga Aho practitioner:
Chris McBride

Te Rongo Aniwaniwa /A Dissonant Harmony

Te Rongo Aniwaniwa /A Dissonant Harmony Artists... Fred Graham / Adrienne Grant / Zena Elliot / Xavier Meade / James Ormsby / Nicole Charles / Star Gossage / Jo Hardy / Kura Te Waru-Rewiri / Laurence Aberhart / Charlotte Graham / Haruhiko Sameshima / Philip Kelly / Tessa Laird / Natalie Robertson / Sandra Thompson / John Howell / A.D. Schierning & Clinton Watkins / sonicsfromscratch: the Kauri Choir / Denise Batchelor / Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra The Kauri proJect has, since 2014, commissioned 14 artists to produce limited edition artworks and an additional artist has allowed TKP to produce his work as one of 15 educational posters. This exhibition also brings together a sculptor, a sound artist, video artists and visual artists. The key aim is to use art as an essential tool in environmental awareness with particular reference to kauri. The project also discusses water, climate and the moana. Te Rongo Aniwaniwa / A Dissonant Harmony brings together work by artists from across the Waikato and beyond to explore the complexity of our relationship with this tree and its forest. The works included are a lament for kauri lost in the past to milling and clearing, and now to dieback – but also speak to a hope for a renewed relationship between people and kauri, of care, love and regrowth. A healthy kauri forest is a wealth of diverse life, a delicate ecological network of interdependence, within which the kauri tree is a keystone species. Able to grow to ancient age and massive scale, kauri have the ability to modify the land on which they live. Around and on the kauri a host of other species live and thrive, some of them only found in this association. Late to this relationship, people have also flourished in Aotearoa/New Zealand, briefly prospering from our relationship with kauri, though at a cost to our landscape which we seek now to redress. Once a powerful presence across Northern Aotearoa, from Waikato to Cape Reinga, kauri forest now exists in scattered fragments and as a legend in the imaginations of the people. Throughout all of this region a handful of ancient giants still stand and young kauri strive for survival, while the ghost of their kin haunt the landscape. Kauri ki uta, Kauri ki tai – May Kauri once again flourish from hilltop to the sea.
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